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Author Topic: Plant a 'small' garden ANYWHERE  (Read 1809 times)
stuckinarut
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« on: July 27, 2009, 04:29:56 PM »

I found some good info on the web about planting some veggie plants even if you have small yards, live in urban areas or if your Neighbor Hood Association doesn't 'allow' it.

You can plant almost any vegetable plant in a planter.  Tomatoes, okra, squash, and herbs.

The great thing about this is, (correct me if I'm wrong), you can

-put a clean sack or plastic over the plant in cooler weather. 
-move plant to sun or shade
-even keep it inside the house

plus you don't have to really 'weed' it out!

Here's some tips I found for this type of garden.
Remember, it may be small, but every little bit helps.
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Sun: Vegetables need a good 6 or more hours of sun each day. Without sun, the fruits will not ripen and the plants will be stressed. There are a few crops that can survive in light shade, lettuce and other greens, broccoli and cole crops, but if you can’t provide sun, you might want to reconsider having a vegetable garden.

Water: Vegetables also require regular watering. Without regular water, vegetables will not fill out and some, like tomatoes, will crack open if suddenly plumped up with water after struggling without for awhile.

You can’t always rely on rain. If you have the means, a drip irrigation system is a definite plus for a vegetable garden. The new component systems are really quite easy to install and cost a lot less than most people think. And you’ll save money on water, because it goes directly to the plant’s roots. Less is lost to evaporation.

If you don’t want to opt for drip irrigation, try and site your vegetable garden near a water spigot. You’ll be more likely to water if you don’t have to drag the hose out.

Soil: The final consideration is essential. Vegetables need a soil rich in organic matter. Soil is important to the growth of all plants, but more so with vegetables, because even taste is affected by the quality of the soil. That’s part of why wine from the same grape variety can vary from region to region and why some areas grow hotter peppers than others.

If you can provide these three basics: sun, water and great soil, you can vegetable garden.

If anyone can shed some light on how to get good organic matter and what it is, I'd appreciate it.  Would this be like compost?
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ZIG-ZAG
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« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2009, 09:28:59 AM »

organic matter would be compost.

fast growing large plants like tomatos,cucumbers,corn,and bell pepper plants will suck regular potting soil dry of nutriants before they are done with one havest.

if you were to grow a container garden your best bet would be to start with good black dirt and add plant food a month or so after the plants pop.

then after the season mix in some grass clippings,leafs,and stalks from the plants into the dirt so it is ready for the next season.

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stuckinarut
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2009, 12:25:06 PM »

I've been doing some reading while away on vacation in San Antonio.  Anyway, I have some ideas and thoughts for those who have restrictions on gardens in their own urban areas...

I am restricted because of the small yard I have, so small raised beds and only necessaties are going to work there.  I also plan to plant 2 dwarf fruit trees and maybe some type of dwarf nut tree...if they're out there.

I've read that the dwarf fruit trees have a suprizingly high yeild for their size and the fruit is every bit as good as their larger counterparts.

This means I'll have fruit, nuts and veggies through the summer and with my fall garden I'll have veggies well into December and possibly January.

Now, that being said, if you aren't allowed any veggie garden (which I've never heard of before)  then plant amoung your flower beds if need be.  A more creative alternative I just recently saw, was;

Install a 'solar tube' for your garage and have planters in there that will benefit from being out of sight, yet enjoy real sunshine...I mean common, it's free!

Well, the solar tubes aren't free though.  They cost around $162.  Not bad considering anytime it's daylight outside you get free light in your garage!

Sure, you could buy a shop light, some growth lamps, pay for the electricity and still not really get real sunshine....this by the way also works all the way through the winter.....might want to cover the plants in a clear or transluscent bag to get a greenhouse effect. 

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Taylor3006
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« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2009, 03:58:53 PM »

Just a suggestion for those of ya'll who have them home owners associations who won't allow you to plant vegetable gardens. I can not tell you how many times I have seen people using kale as an ornamental. They are them purple cabbage like plants and have seen them in neighborhoods and at businesses. At home I grow chives around trees, they are pretty and come back year after year and cheaper than using "monkey grass" for borders. I spent one dime on a packet of chive seeds in 1997 and they still are growing like weeds. I am not the worlds best gardener, am sure someone with more experience than I could make a list of edible ornamentals. Now that I write this, I think I have a book on edible landscaping.....
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Amigatec
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« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2009, 04:52:14 PM »

I have also heard of people using Strawberries as ground cover in their flower beds.
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stuckinarut
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« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2009, 10:27:01 PM »

2Dogs is an expert in this area.  I'll try to get her on here to reply with a decent list of edible landscaping.

I love the chive idea.  I definetely need to plant some! 
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LastDragonfly
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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2009, 08:45:23 PM »

When you get a chance stop by and pick up the URBAN FARM magazine...they have some great ideas and address the housing association issue also...
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Mom of 2 Soldiers
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2009, 09:13:53 AM »

Our first garden was an eight foot by eight foot raised bed.  I was amazing what we produced from it.  By constantly rotating crops and keeping it full, you can do very well.
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