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Author Topic: Homestead setup  (Read 3812 times)
captcrunch227
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« on: February 27, 2015, 10:40:07 AM »

Hey y'all. Wanted to ask for some advice here as some of you are homesteaders. We are in the process of purchasing a home with an acre on it. I'm gonna have close to 3/4 of an acre to setup shop on. Given the space limitations, I was wanting to look for some advice on here as to what anyone here with some experience would recommend setting up.

My list currently consists of:
a decent sized garden
fruit and nut trees
chickens
rabbits.

I plan on learning to can also and hopefully canning the fruits and veggies that don't get eaten.

But any additional ideas would be very helpful and I'd be very grateful for them. Thanks a ton y'all and I look forward to the reply's!
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"You cannot save the planet. You may be able to save yourself and your family." 
-Clint Smith

"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and passed on ... or we will spend our sunset years telling our children's children what it was like in the United States when men were free."
– Ronald Reagan
FighterDoc
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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2015, 04:37:38 PM »

I'm looking forward to the responses as well.  I certainly think you can do all of this on 3/4 of an acre.
Key things to consider: make sure you don't have an HOA saying no, or neighbors that let their dogs/cats out at night...
Your climate and water situation will impact your plans a great deal, as will the general slope/grade of the land.  (The guy in South Florida plans differently than central Nevada who plans differently than the east slope of the Rockies.)
Any generics you can give on the climate/water?
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FighterDoc
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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2015, 04:38:46 PM »

And don't forget to check out the most recent podcast 258, that may help as well!
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captcrunch227
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« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2015, 09:26:03 AM »

I'm looking forward to the responses as well.  I certainly think you can do all of this on 3/4 of an acre.
Key things to consider: make sure you don't have an HOA saying no, or neighbors that let their dogs/cats out at night...
Your climate and water situation will impact your plans a great deal, as will the general slope/grade of the land.  (The guy in South Florida plans differently than central Nevada who plans differently than the east slope of the Rockies.)
Any generics you can give on the climate/water?

I'm glad you mentioned grade/slope, that's something I had overlooked. I'm in north Texas ( Dallas fort  worth area) no HOA for me, same reason I don't wanna live in the city. I've got a problem with someone telling me what I can do with my house and my land lol. Especially when I'm paying 6 figures for  something. Haha
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"You cannot save the planet. You may be able to save yourself and your family." 
-Clint Smith

"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and passed on ... or we will spend our sunset years telling our children's children what it was like in the United States when men were free."
– Ronald Reagan
markthenewf
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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2015, 09:57:59 AM »

I'm looking at possibly adding some trees as well.  My land is fairly small (less than 1/4 acre usable) and is on an incline (perhaps 3-4 degrees), so I wonder if that's too much drainage.  In other words, the slope prevents water from staying with the plants.
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Mexicanjoe
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2015, 11:13:58 AM »

I agree with Doc.

You will be surprised at how little land you actually will use. We have 10 acres but probably don't use but about 1 actively.

Some one mentioned grade. This is an important factor both for gardening and water. I like to plant Clover in the winter up hill from my fruit trees. Clover is a nitrogen fixer and places nitrogen on the surface. your garden and trees will love natural nitrogen instead of what you purchase in a bag and it comes back for a couple of years. I usually over seed on a yearly basis. I also learned (the hard way) to plant on Contour and not down the slope.
I mow across the slope to create small lines that slow the water and give it time to soak in and stay on the property as long as possible.
Finding local utility companies that are grinding trees and need a place to dump the chips is a great asset. If you happen to give the driver $20 he may be more apt to drop more than 1 load (I got 9).

Adding Bees will really make your harvests better. Weather it is fruit trees or a garden you will see more production. We have not been able to harvest any of the honey yet as this is the first year but by spring we will be able too and it is all natural and so local its in my back yard.

I learned that even if a tree doesn't need a cross pollinator if you add one anyway it helps quite a bit.

Learn about growing zones and what zone you are in. This will help you with Chill hours (the hours a plant needs to be under 40 degrees to see that it has been through winter and able to fruit).

A green house is nice and can be build using cattle panels. I created a video on my Youtube page on this and it is doing great even in the tornado we just had. (https://www.facebook.com/NETexasPreppers or directly at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ3Qar5y5J66G6gQDdQ30Zj_IQXhapbo-

We wanted the green house to grow vegetables all year as well as herbs that don't like the cold. We were also able to get a couple of grapefruit trees that don't weather well here but will do good if you winter them in a green house.

I found a variety of Avocado that will handle our cold but needs to be hardened for the first few years in the green house. after the bark hardens it will handle the cold here just fine. I am not a guy who likes avocados but I do want to be the only fat kid in the area who has a couple of Avocado trees when TSHTF. Satsuma oranges grow in our cold climate and I have a couple of those as well.

When you start working towards you set up keep an eye on the long term goal and "try" to not conflict with what you may want in the future.

Don't let set backs dissuade you from trying more stuff. My first few gardens didn't work out at all while Super Dave after watching me had a killer garden the first year. I tend to do better with fruit trees and Blue Berry bushes. One of my hardest challenges was to leave the bees alone.

I now have 4 hives but only one is occupied. I am always looking to add another colony or a place to put a hive on some one else's property. If I can do that I can help them with fertilization and I can get the honey.

So keep in mind that there is plenty to do. I still say if you can get a little place out in the country and live on it (even if it causes a longer commute) its worth it. Your time off of work will be better spent and you will be more relaxed.
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markthenewf
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« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2015, 04:47:28 PM »

So keep in mind that there is plenty to do. I still say if you can get a little place out in the country and live on it (even if it causes a longer commute) its worth it. Your time off of work will be better spent and you will be more relaxed.

^^^This, if for no other reason.
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Keep your stick on the ice....

Mark
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