Today's Survival Show Forum
December 18, 2017, 01:37:45 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Today's Survival Forum, share your survival ideas.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register Chat  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Tampons. Yes.... tampons.  (Read 6570 times)
DestructoTex
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 23



« on: June 05, 2013, 09:20:51 AM »

Ran across this article today and thought it would fit right in.... er... would be right up our alley ... um ... would be perfect for this forum.

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/06/05/survival-tampon/
Logged

Be prepared. The motto of the Boy Scouts is also a good motto for life.
oldsoldier
Global Moderator
Hero Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 782


« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2013, 02:04:34 PM »

I've had tampons as part of my medical supplies for over 20 years. They taught us in the army about using them for gunshot wounds and other uses. The maxi pads are also great as trauma dressings.
Logged

If I can help one person to get prepared, If I can through my knowledge and prevent them from making the mistakes I have made. If I can help just one person to obtain the knowledge that will save their life or the life of a loved one. Then I will know that the time and work I have invested was and is worth every minute spent.
Thox Spuddy
Guest
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2013, 07:18:02 PM »

When I had a nosebleed that wouldn't stop the emergency room visit stuck what was basically a tampon up my nose and kept it there for 24 hours. There is no other way of stopping something like that.
Logged
Taylor3006
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 88



« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2013, 11:08:29 PM »

When I had a nosebleed that wouldn't stop the emergency room visit stuck what was basically a tampon up my nose and kept it there for 24 hours. There is no other way of stopping something like that.

Am guessing that ER has not heard of silver nitrate swabs... I keep maxi pads and tampons in my medical supplies for their intended use as well as emergency backup battle dressings. Technically they are not sterile although I would bet money they are damn close to it and inserting something into a wound just dosent sit right with me. Direct pressure, elevation, and tourniquet as a last resort is still my repitoire although have read great things about the blood coagulant powders and gels. Remember it's all just to stop the bleeding so they survive long enuff to get surgical wound repair.
Logged

"Courage is contagious. When a brave man takes a stand, the spines of others are stiffened."   Rev. Billy Graham
DestructoTex
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 23



« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2013, 06:10:01 AM »

Something I learned in karate class when I was little...

To stop a nose bleed, roll up some toilet paper or tissue (or paper) and insert it inside your top lip between your gum and lip. There's a pressure point in there and it stops the bleeding immediately (at least it always has for me and my family).
Logged

Be prepared. The motto of the Boy Scouts is also a good motto for life.
Mexicanjoe
Prolific Prepper Sponge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 723



« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2013, 05:54:46 AM »

We have had tampons in all of our medical kits for years. bullet holes was the initial reason from the Army days.
Now my kits have them for female emergencies while out on training excursions.

All in all the space that 6-8 OBs take up is well worth the cost and jabs from people.
Logged

Better to have it and not need it Then need it and not have it.
DestructoTex
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 23



« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2014, 09:54:56 AM »

I had a prepper fail recently. My wife had a need for some feminine hygiene products while we were at the Frio river a few weeks ago. Her "little friend" came sooner than she expected.

"No problem," I thought. I've got some in my get-home kit in my truck. Win!

Only I didn't. I put them in my bugout bag, which was at home. FAIL.

Putting some tampons in my get home kit now, also...
Logged

Be prepared. The motto of the Boy Scouts is also a good motto for life.
ravenwolf31
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 532



WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2014, 03:45:48 PM »

Ran across this article today and thought it would fit right in.... er... would be right up our alley ... um ... would be perfect for this forum.

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/06/05/survival-tampon/
That site is pretty awesome, I read it every few weeks and it has helped me in a lot of ways. It has a lot of good info.
Logged

If a man lose ev'rything he owns
Has he truly lost his worth?
Or is it the beginning
Of a new and brighter birth? -- Through Heavens's Eyes, Prince of Egypt Soundtrack.

Preppers: We are the type that for when the world hands us lemons, we make beef stew. Then we just sit back and watch while everyone else wonders how the hell we got beef stew out of lemons. Oh and we are willing to teach them how we did it. -- Ravenwolf

The Wolf Den My Blog
Mexicanjoe
Prolific Prepper Sponge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 723



« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2014, 05:45:58 PM »

All of my bags have a med kit on them and they are all pretty much the same its more about quantity of supplies dependent on bag size.
Logged

Better to have it and not need it Then need it and not have it.
markthenewf
Chief Newf
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 465


Chief Newf


« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2014, 08:06:38 PM »

I was under the impression that tampons were not a good thing to use on an open wound as it's 'sucking up' the fluid and not necessarily stopping the bleeding.  Am I right or wrong on that?
Logged

Keep your stick on the ice....

Mark
Mexicanjoe
Prolific Prepper Sponge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 723



« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2014, 01:53:37 PM »

In my view it is a pressure bandage. I would like to refer this to fighter doc.
Logged

Better to have it and not need it Then need it and not have it.
FighterDoc
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 294



« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2014, 07:21:30 PM »

So, like all the best 'experts' out there, I'll give the 'final' answer!
--It Depends!--
OK, there's more to it, but it gets pretty complicated pretty quickly.
If life and the world is stable and everything is going great and you are considering cramming a tampon up your nose to stop the bleeding, I'd say 'nah, head to the ER or urgent care clinic'.  There is some potential for harm, especially if you use a maxi instead of a tampon!
The risk from these things is low, but cram too aggressively and you could create new, worse problems.  These products are 'clean' and not sterile.  They are generally great for pretty superficial wounds in the short term, but for placing into non-standard openings, or for leaving in place more than the drive to the ER, there is risk.  For example, a dry tampon up the nose will tamponade the bleeding.  (Yup, that's the real word for stopping bleeding, now you know where 'tampon' comes from!)  However, a dry tampon up the nose that is left in place for too long risks breaking down the nasal mucosa because it dries it out.  To prevent this, the fancy $100 ER nasal tampons (or Rhino Rocket as we sometimes call them) are coated in vaseline.  Yup, a tub of vaseline and tampons and you could change the world for pennies.  (They make for great firestarters too, but that's another story for another day.)  The vaseline keeps the mucosa from drying out too much and tearing while the bleeding stops, and it makes it a lot less miserable to remove.
Removal of these items is the other key point.  I've removed some tampons that were in place for...I'll just say longer than intended.  When used as directed, they generally don't cause problems since they are generally clean, used by healthy people, and left in place for hours, not weeks.  However, if you have a dirty wound (fell on a muddy stick in the woods that went 2 inches into your thigh), the situation changes.  If you're bleeding significantly from the wound, pack a tampon (or 2, 3, 4, however many to stop the bleeding) pronto and head to medical attention.  A dirty wound that is packed and left alone for more than an hour or two is looking for trouble.  In a really bad situation (no food for two days, dehydrated, no medical attention for miles), this situation becomes more critical as you were starting off with a depressed immune system and less reserve to deal with injury and subsequent infection.  Personally, I'm going to consider the situation carefully.  Flush the wound as much as you can with clean water and see if you can stop the bleeding with direct pressure outside the wound, maxi over the top, elevate the wound, etc.  If that doesn't work pretty quick, flush it again, pack it and look for better care and antibiotics.  If that wound stays packed as is for a day, when it is time to remove the dressing, you're risking rebleeding, tissue injury, a ton of 'discomfort', and recreating the badness that started this mess.  If you are 'getting out of dodge' with one of these packed for a week with two tampons in your thigh held in place with duct tape...it just gets worse.  If you can find good care, this is potentially very salvagable, potentially. 
If we make the wound into the abdomen or chest cavity, the level of difficulty goes up, and the utility of tampons and maxis goes way down.  You can't tamponade off a bleeder in the abdomen with a tampon.  They work by expanding in size to block off the walls of the cavity and seal off the small bleeders while absorbing the fluids.  If it is just absorbing fluid and not putting pressure into the space, add more tampons as needed, bigger wounds need more.  In the belly, there is too much room for expansion that you'll never cut off the small bleeders, and too much fluid to work correctly.  So we'll pray for no cavity wounds in the chest/abdomen/pelvis.
Maxis are great for external compression dressings since they are clean, absorbent, pre-packaged, and cheaper than a box of clean 4x4s usually.  Off brand are generally ok too. 
Clean the wound, elevate, direct pressure and good bandages will get you far.  With some training these two devices (with vaseline) have a bunch of great first aid uses!
Good topic DestructoTex!  And I know what you mean when you started the thread.  Sometimes when things get awkward, like when it comes to tampons, you have to just jump right in and not worry about how messy it gets...no wait, that's not right either...
Logged

I will no longer accept the things I cannot change...I will now change the things I cannot accept!

FighterDoc
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Install SMF Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!