Today's Survival Show Forum
June 23, 2017, 08:42:07 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Today's Survival Forum, share your survival ideas.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register Chat  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: How do you gain skills?  (Read 8044 times)
Frazer
Apartment Prepper!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



WWW
« on: September 01, 2010, 05:57:07 AM »

I've been thinking of ways to acquire skills that could be helpful in a rough situation or the bad times that are coming to the whole world. I'm an international listener since the show is produced in the USA but I can see the writing on the wall that we are all going to need skills to survive no matter where we live.

When you think about it if you were wanting to start a prepping community where everyone brought something to the table in a mutual agreement where everyone involved would chip in and you'd all work together to survive through the coming economic collapse you need to ask yourself this question. What do I bring to the table?

In the emerging economy coming out of the collapse that is coming I think it will be hard skills that will help you sustain yourself. Can you build a security fence out of scrap lumber? Can you weld a tower together for a HAM radio operator who might not have the skills to build the tower and not have the money to buy a commercial tower?

Bob Mayne of Today's Survival Show did a show called Become a Jack of All Trades and Survive.I think he is dead on with that line of thinking. So the question comes up, how do you gain these skills?

Well there are many ways. You can take classes at your local community college to get some basic skills. I'm looking at a basic vehicle maintenance class and a small engine repair class offered. I'm also looking at some continuing education courses offered by some of the local high schools where I can learn a little bit of welding and carpentry. You can volunteer with Habitat for Humanity to learn some construction skills.  You can even do an unpaid apprenticeship for a couple months in your spare time with someone who knows what you want to know.  It can never hurt to ask.  Take any chance you get to expand your skills!

In Ontario Canada where I live some people took courses paid for by the government to gain new skills after being laid off. Well if you qualify why not look at the long term and maybe go to a private career college for welding or something like that where you can gain a valuable skill and not have to pay for it? I don't agree with our government supplying these courses for people and funding them going to school again especially since the program was aimed at people who lost jobs that made a very good living who if they were smart could have had a big emergency fund and stashes of cash to get them through plus money to take a course if they were smart with their overpaid union jobs. But the thing is the government was going to do it whether we all liked it or not so if you can qualify why not take advantage of what your tax dollars are paying for?

Get books on things like plumbing and electrical work. This way if you have to at least you can look up how to fix something. Resources and knowledge will be huge in the new economy that is emerging.

Take any chance you get to learn skills and gain valuable knowledge.

[What have you done to prep this week?]

Frazer

Cross Posted from my blog found at http://rooftopeagle.blogspot.com/

http://rooftopeagle.blogspot.com/2010/09/skills-for-coming-collapse.html
« Last Edit: September 01, 2010, 08:17:20 AM by Todays Survival Show » Logged

vigilant20
viggie the veggie
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 19



WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2010, 06:25:52 AM »

You can only learn so much in a class.  In my mind the only way to learn the skills you'll need are to live that life now.  There's no room for a learning curve once your life depends on it.  I see tons of people who call themselves survivalists and have all the toys, but aren't trying to live a more self-sufficient life...and THOSE are the skills that will get you through.
Logged

CX
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 371


« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2010, 07:36:09 AM »

Great thread!

Much of the time you need look no further than the people around you if you want to learn a new skill.

My dad was a carpenter, so he taught me things as a kid. My step father in later life was an electrician and plumber, so i asked him to teach me things.

My girlfriend taught me how to knit, yes it's a skill some people laugh about men doing, but it was invented by men, and hey...i can keep my girls warm with just a couple of hours of work.

Whatever skill you are after learning, half the battle is having the confidence to ask someone if they'll teach you.

CX.
Logged
40Cal Joe
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 689



« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2010, 10:09:39 AM »

Real learning comes from practice or doing, in my experience. I can sit down and read a book about tying knots, but until I actually practice tying the knot, its useless for me. Others may be different.
Logged

My weapons locker is filled with
More guns than I need
But not all that I want.
Frazer
Apartment Prepper!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2010, 10:51:42 AM »

Real learning comes from practice or doing, in my experience. I can sit down and read a book about tying knots, but until I actually practice tying the knot, its useless for me. Others may be different.

Agreed, there is a saying...Use it or loose it!  We need to put our skills into practice in order to keep those skills.

For example next week I'm starting my HAM radio course.  It's nice to get your license but if you don't use the license it was a waste of time.  If you buy a radio and never use it when the SHTF and you need to use that rig for em-comms you'll bomb and never get the piece of traffic across effectively.  If we don't use our skills on a regular basis we'll fail miserably if we don't get to know our skills an limits of what we can do on a personal level!
Logged

Ottar
I am Ottar NOT Pttar
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 193



« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2010, 11:03:06 AM »

Been a Ham for years
KD7AXH
Logged

"There's only one basic human right, the right to do as you damn well please. And with it comes the only basic human duty, the duty to take the consequences." P.J. O'Rourke
40Cal Joe
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 689



« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2010, 12:35:45 PM »

I love HAM and Cheese. Grin Seriously, I have been thinking about getting a Ham license for some time now. Just need to make up my mind and DO IT.
Logged

My weapons locker is filled with
More guns than I need
But not all that I want.
Ottar
I am Ottar NOT Pttar
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 193



« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2010, 01:31:03 PM »

40calJoe and anyone interested,

I went through this practice test for a few weeks prior to testing and passed with flying colors a LONG time back during last century at :

http://www.qrz.com/xtest2.html

There are  other practice tests available by doing a google search


Ottar
 
Logged

"There's only one basic human right, the right to do as you damn well please. And with it comes the only basic human duty, the duty to take the consequences." P.J. O'Rourke
Frazer
Apartment Prepper!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2010, 01:46:19 PM »

Been a Ham for years
KD7AXH

Cool!!!!  Grin
Logged

oldsoldier
Global Moderator
Hero Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 782


« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2010, 06:30:32 PM »

 With you living in Canada, Not sure if you have it. BUT try the Boy scouts or whatever your equivelent is. Most troops here at least never have enough adult help. Not only would you be helping out some young people but you can also pick up some great outdoor skills as well. Things like fire starting, rapelling, dutch oven cooking, and....... well you get what I mean.
Logged

If I can help one person to get prepared, If I can through my knowledge and prevent them from making the mistakes I have made. If I can help just one person to obtain the knowledge that will save their life or the life of a loved one. Then I will know that the time and work I have invested was and is worth every minute spent.
midge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 586


« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2010, 01:23:55 AM »

Reading a book or taking a class or on-line learning is not the be all- end all of knowing a skill. But is the starting step. If, for whatever reason, you cannot actually DO a thing to learn the skill, get the head start by reading up on the science behind it, the development history, the differences of technique, etc.
I learned canning by myself, reading books and on-line sites. I knew it front and backwards by the time I got a canner and some jars. I tried what I had learned and succeeded with flying colors.
For years I have been teaching myself what I could of medicine. I started with a medical dictionary, learning what they call things, and what procedures are. (ectomies- taking something out vs. otomies- just cutting to take a look)  I most certainly hope I will never need to use my rudimentary medical knowledge, but I sure understand my doctor better.

Hands on learning is always best. But if you can't get that, read a book. Take a class. Look it up. You can look up a hundred things a day with the internet, and at least understand some of what you need.
Logged

All the world is Mad, save Thee and me, and at times me thinks that Thou art also Mad.
Todays Survival Show
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2794



WWW
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2010, 08:33:13 AM »

I remember an old saying, "every man is my teacher."

One of the best ways to learn a skill is to watch it being done, then try it yourself. Last night penguinofdoom joined me at an IDPA shooting match. It was her first time. First she heard a lecture, then watched 10 people do it, then she did it herself!  All in one night!  What better way to learn? She did quite well and improved a skill.
Logged

To know that even one life has breathed easier because I have lived, that is to have succeeded. - Ralph Waldo Emerson.


www.todayssurvival.com
Bob@todayssurvival.com
40Cal Joe
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 689



« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2010, 02:41:37 PM »

40calJoe and anyone interested,

I went through this practice test for a few weeks prior to testing and passed with flying colors a LONG time back during last century at :

http://www.qrz.com/xtest2.html

There are  other practice tests available by doing a google search


Ottar

Thank-you sir, much appreciated.
 
Logged

My weapons locker is filled with
More guns than I need
But not all that I want.
Mexicanjoe
Prolific Prepper Sponge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 723



« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2013, 07:21:28 AM »

I say reach out here and start networking. Find people in your area that are prepping and get together with them. Even if they are too far away swap documents that they have.

if your not moving forward then your moving backwards.
Logged

Better to have it and not need it Then need it and not have it.
Clay
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


WWW
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2015, 02:43:52 PM »

When it comes to learning skills, I learned a lot when I joined the local volunteer fire department.  We did a lot of knot tying, driving, surviving, disaster mitigation, medical, and tool maintenance to name a few.  If you really get involved with the fire department they will pay for you to sit in a class to get certified in whatever you can think of.  Plus all of that knowledge that you learn goes right into practice when you are training or responding to an emergency.  The overall benefit of joining a VFD... all the training is FREE and you do not have to be certified to start, you just have to do so in a timely manor.  Check out your local VFDs for more information.

Along with that I host a podcast called Skilled Gentlemen Podcast where we have talked a lot about skills.  Many topics have been spoken about and more to come. 
Logged

Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Install SMF Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!