Today's Survival Show Forum
August 17, 2017, 04:27:10 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Today's Survival Forum, share your survival ideas.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register Chat  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Episode 105 - Apartment Prepping  (Read 3445 times)
Frazer
Apartment Prepper!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



WWW
« on: August 18, 2010, 05:09:52 AM »

I want to thank Bob for having me on the show, it was a blast!  We really need to do another show, there is a lot of information that I think people forget about.  For a while I felt like I couldn't prep since I lived in an apartment since most of the content available made it seem like you must be in a house and own property.

There are some obstacles of apartment prepping but I find it is very enjoyable, though I do plan on owning a house and property in the future!
There is a lot you can do in an apartment or rented property.  You may not be able to put in permanent backup gen-sets that kicks on when the power goes out but you can be very prepared in an apartment.

Hey Bob, I think a section on the forum for apartment or renters might be a good idea.  It could cover things like being prepared on the road in hotels, apartments, rented houses and other property that you may not own.  Just a thought.

Guys, sorry for my constant "umm" and "awws"  Cheesy
Logged

delete me
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 78


« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2010, 03:02:27 PM »

lol i know all about apt prepping Cool
Logged
Todays Survival Show
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2794



WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2010, 05:41:44 PM »

A lot of what Frazer and I talked about are just good basics or prepping that apply to anyone. I still get emails from new preppers tha live in apartments or dense urban areas so that episode was mainly for them. Hope you all enjoyed it though.
Logged

To know that even one life has breathed easier because I have lived, that is to have succeeded. - Ralph Waldo Emerson.


www.todayssurvival.com
Bob@todayssurvival.com
ravenwolf31
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 532



WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2010, 03:43:19 PM »

That was a really great podcast! I too live in an apartment, AND I am a prepper. I feel that when it comes to living in an apartment, prepping is essential because of the fact that you are limited. It is pretty tough to live in an apartment, but in reality, it is just learning to live in a small space. Small spaces are not just limited to apartments, some are living in houses smaller than an apartment.

One of the biggest limits is space and storage, but here is a chance to be creative! When looking for storage, think Under, In and Up.

Under as in spaces under your bed, tables like what Frazer mentioned or high legged chairs that you do not have to move.

For 'In' what comes to mind is of course rubbermaid tubs, but again get creative. Think 'hidden in plain sight'. Enclosed end tables with doors, entertainment centers, a wooden trunk serves as storage as well as a decorative coffee table (YAY for multi-function!) Benches that you can lift up the seat for storage. I have even seen an ENTIRE KITCHEN in an armoire!

Next is Up. All apartments have some sort of closet and cabinet system, unfortunately for preppers as well as everyone else, efficiency apartment cabinets are not very large or efficient so that means it would help to have more shelves. If your landlord does allow you to put things like that up on a wall, then great! Many do not how ever, but there is no reason that you cant have shelves. Bookcases, free standing shelves and utility cabinets work well. If you cant afford to buy or make any of those, then get milk crates. They work really well as low makeshift shelving when stacked on each other, I know, I use them as small bookshelves! Also, stack your rubber tubs. Another idea is a rolling cart that not only adds counter space, but also a couple of shelves underneath. There some out there that are not very expensive and have a nice butcher block top.

If ya need ideas, just google 'Small Space Living'. There are a ton of sites out there for it. This is one that I mentioned earlier: http://smallspaceliving.blogspot.com Sure it has not been updated in a while, but it still has some good articles.

Frazer, Bob, this was a very good interview that gave even me a few ideas, I loved that shelf idea. Thanks!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2010, 04:02:03 PM by ravenwolf31 » Logged

If a man lose ev'rything he owns
Has he truly lost his worth?
Or is it the beginning
Of a new and brighter birth? -- Through Heavens's Eyes, Prince of Egypt Soundtrack.

Preppers: We are the type that for when the world hands us lemons, we make beef stew. Then we just sit back and watch while everyone else wonders how the hell we got beef stew out of lemons. Oh and we are willing to teach them how we did it. -- Ravenwolf

The Wolf Den My Blog
Todays Survival Show
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2794



WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2010, 04:27:09 PM »

Glad you enjoyed it raven!  We may do a Part 2 in a few weeks.  If you have ideas, send them to me.
Logged

To know that even one life has breathed easier because I have lived, that is to have succeeded. - Ralph Waldo Emerson.


www.todayssurvival.com
Bob@todayssurvival.com
mbarnatl
Global Moderator
Hero Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 618



WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2010, 05:20:22 PM »

I was wondering if you use caches. When we used to live in apartments we also had a travel trailer, it was always stocked and ready to go at any time. Just a few other ideas.
Logged

"The ability for a person to prevail in a survival situation is based on three factors: survival knowledge, equipment, and will to survive. All are important, but the most important is the will to survive." -Greg Davenport

Prepare for Tomorrow
http://www.facebook.com/mbarnatl
http://twitter.com/mbarnatl
New Iowa Prepper
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4



« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2010, 01:08:24 PM »

Bob,

I would love it if you can have more episodes on this topic. I live in a small place and love to have more ideas on this subject. I wish I could move out and get a place in the country, but in this economy it will not happen for a long time. Thank you for talking about this topic. It helped me think about this topic, if anyone has links to blogs on this topic I would love to get them off you. 
Logged
rainygardener
Guest
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2010, 01:49:08 PM »

Since the dehydrate2store site was posted in our forum, I have gone nuts dehydrating vegetables. They become so small and light you can store them just about anywhere in your house with very little space taken up and they last a long time.
Logged
Frazer
Apartment Prepper!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



WWW
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2010, 11:10:17 AM »

I just picked up an old Coleman stove (circa 1970) that came with 2 different conversion kits, one white gas conversion and a propane conversion kit,  this gives me a tri-fuel camp stove that is much better built than most similar models by the same company produces today.  I picked it up, in the box never used on Kijiji.ca for $50. (It's the Craigs List of Canada, free online classifieds)

On a quick side note I am more happy that the government didn't get a cut of this gem through taxes!

So I was at a local Hardware store buying some 1lb propane tanks and some Coleman camp fuel and it hit me, my land lord might not like all this flammable stuff sitting around my apartment.  So I turned my cart around and bought a couple Action Packer totes.  They are really heavy duty rubber-maid like totes that can really take a beating!

My idea was to put the fuels in these two totes and put a pad lock on them so that a nosy super-attendant doesn't look in them (action packers have a place for a pad lock)

Normally I don't want to break rules (although I'm not 100% sure there is any rule about this) but I figure that since my land lord doesn't guarantee power will be delivered having some supplies to keep my place warm and be able to cook is worth potentially bending rules.

Mind you don't be stupid about your storage, my little back closet storage room inside my apartment is ventilated and I don't keep unstable gases and fuels in there.  I don't keep gasoline for the generator for example and I will always use my super siphon to pump any left over fuel from the generator into my vehicle when I'm done with it!  I do however keep four 5 gallon surplus metal jerry cans in my storage room for if I do need to acquire some gasoline for the generator and I have also made a rig for extending my Honda EU2000i generators gas tank with two of the gas cans.
Logged

Frazer
Apartment Prepper!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



WWW
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2010, 11:16:00 AM »

Here is some more of what I've done since this podcast aired


I find the best generator for an apartment is a Honda EU2000i!  It's very compact, quiet, fuel efficient and easy to transport.  Of course some of that makes it easier to steal so my plan is to use an Eye bolt screw I have bought and if I need to run the gen-set for an emergency to power my AC or my electric oil heater I'll take my charged battery powered Impact wrench and drill that eye bolt into the side of the building allowing me to attach a heavy duty chain and a heavy duty industrial pad lock to the gen-set and the gas cans to make it harder to just walk up and take them.
Also to help protect the gen-set I purchased a special cord lock that has a little battery powered siren built into it and it's designed so that cutting the cord will break the circuit safety allowing the circuit to make a connection there by sounding the alarm.  The final safeguard for the gen-set is I've bought a very bright battery powered motion detector light that will do two things if someone passes it when I'm sleeping, first I've wired a chime into it that you'd use for your front door so it will alert me inside whether I am awake or not as to motion outside, it was a little pricy but I figured it was worth it to get the higher quality motion sensor that wont give you false alarms making you not check fast enough after being desensitized to the alarm over several false alarms.  The way it works is it looks for heat not actually motion, so a human's warm body will set off the alarm and turn on the light but at the same time it wont go off if a branch blows past the sensor.  I've also wired the sensor up to a DC powered lamp that I'd put inside my bedroom to provide another alert system to help wake me if I am sleeping while the generator is outside.

Another Large prep I've done has been buying a US surplus Yukon M1950 stove.  I'm going to link to a video that I found online that turned me on to this stove system for long term SHTF heating and cooking inside my apartment if I cannot go somewhere more secure.  The M1950 is also very portable so I can bring it with me easily enough in a bug out situation to provide heat for me inside my surplus tent I got at a local Army Navy store.  (I'll talk about the tent in one second) The M1950 stove can be used on gasoline, diesel fuel, Motor oil or solid fuels like coal or wood.  There will be plenty of scrap wood around post SHTF to gather and if you get the right supplies you can even take fuel out of abandoned vehicles to power your gen-set or even your M1950 stove! (look on amazon for something called a "Super syphon" for one of the best refuelling on the run options as well as a good way to scavenge fuel from abandoned vehicles)

The final large prep purchase I've made is an old Surplus tent that was used in the Arctic for shelter.  It is actually the model that the M1950 stove would have worked with so it can be heated well in the winter.  It is a heavy canvas tent with heavy gauge aluminium support rods and it's pretty heavy, it weights about 25lbs and is not a back packing tent by any means.  It is almost the same size (by square footage) as my bedroom and is perfect for a small living quarters if I have to bug out.  I can't seem to find any quality links to my tent but it's similar to the Military GP Small Wall Tent with a draw string closure seal for the M1950 stoves (or similar stoves).

So now I have shelter heat and cooking covered as well as some off grid abilities be it short term ice storm knocking the power out or long term civil unrest with the grid down!

Some videos I found on Rental and city prepping can be found on youtube at this playlist which I'll update as Yankeeprepper puts out more on this series!

Small | Large
Logged

will2power
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 74


« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2011, 07:13:03 AM »

I'm a little behind, I only listened to this podcast today.

As an apartment dweller myself I loved this episode, I really hope you do a follow up Bob!

I would have to say that as an apartment prepper there are some major advantages with apartment prepping, security mostly. I live on the top floor of my apartment building meaning that my front door is the only way in or out. And to get anywhere near my front door you need to be buzzed though 2 steel gates. With the security on my front door I feel very secure up here,

The biggest problem I've found is storing large quantities of water. with many similar nifty storage hints as in the podcast I've found it easy to put away about 6 months worth of food. But even utilising all the space under my bed and at the back of my sheets/blankets cupboard I can only store around 350L of water which is around 6 months drinking not including what I'll need for cooking/cleaning/rehydrating, ect. I do have water filters handy that could certainly be used to drink from a nearby (but not close) river. I also plan to fill my bath at the first sign of trouble which increases my storage by about 200L. I'm sure that if push came to shove I and many others that live in apartments could find other containers they could fill in an emergency. I don't expect water will the the first of the services to go. Particularly as many towns (including mine) have large holding tanks on hills or on water towers to increase pressure.
Logged
will2power
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 74


« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2011, 07:27:52 AM »

Also, I'm sure he wouldn't mind me saying.
My friend (who lives in a smaller apartment) has great plan.

With the money he saves from living in a smaller place he rents a storage locker thats about the size of a garage a couple of suburbs away. He probably saves about $200 per week in rent and the locker only costs $50 per month. He can afford to have what is effectively a large survival cache away from his secure place of residence. Its close enough to walk to in a half hour or so if the 3-7 day supply in his home isn't sufficient. It also serves as a fairly secure BOL. It's also close to the route that is fastest out of town.

As far as I'm concerned its not as good as keeping all those supplies in your apartment or storage area, but if you live in a small place it is very cost effective.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC | Install SMF Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!