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Author Topic: Buggin In: Are you prepared to stay at home  (Read 18493 times)
Darkwinter
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« on: September 07, 2009, 05:52:59 PM »

Diease outbreaks are one emergency where you will need to BUG IN instead of BUGGING OUT.  Be it H1N1 this fall, or some other disease in the near future, we may have to self quarantine to protect ourselves from infectious disease.

When considering bugging in for pandemic, food is your number one concern.  You should have a bare minimum of three weeks worth of STORED FOOD.  Most Americans have a week or two already in the fridge.  I would suggest having one months worth of food, but that is ONLY a suggestion.  The more food you have stored the better.

You will not have to worry about water so much in an outbreak emergency.  There are few things that would turn the water off in a pandemic.

One thing most people overlook is work.  The flu season happens in the FALL and the vacation season is in the SUMMER.  Many Americans are without sick time/vacation time by the middle of flu season.  They may go to work even if they are ill.  It is my opinion that you stay at home if you are ill.  You don't want to spread the illness to others at work.  But if you have no time off left, how can you stay home.  It may be too late for you this year to save some sick time for the flu season.

You may want to ask you employer if you have a pandemic plan.  I am the pandemic officer for my office.  We have gathered cell numbers and land lines for our staff and have complied a list of people with high speed internet.  We are ready to open our office up online if needed.  Check with your employer and see if they have a plan in place.  If you are the employer consider how many people you can afford to be at home ill.  Can your employees work form home?

If you are hourly, can you afford to stay at home?  It is important to have a savings for any emergency, a flu bug in is no different.  If you are out of work for a few days no big deal.  But what happens if you need to be out of work for a couple of weeks.  I would suggest having a bare minimum of one paycheck in the bank.  Just because you are sick, or if your business closes, your bill collectors are still going to be calling (they can work from home Smiley ).

Do you have children?  You will need to have a plan ready for alternative care.  I am predicting many school closings this year.  They may be 3-5 days or even 1-2 weeks.  Do you have alternative care ready for your children if the schools or daycares close?

finally you may not be able to get to the store.  Stores could be closed periodically due to lack of staff.  Goods may be late to deliver due to sick delivery drivers.  You need to have a stockpile of everything you need.  Do you have a woodburning stove?  Do you have maintainace medications?  Anything you use or need, make sure you have at least 3 weeks worth (1-3 months is better, and 1 year makes you the prepper of the year!! Smiley )

We all hope this flu will just be an annoyance this year, but we can't count on it.  Make sure you have a plan to take care of yourself and your family this coming flu season.

P.S.  Wash your hands, don't rub your ears, nose, mouth or eyes with dirty hands.  That is the best defense.

You can reference the CDC website for more information: http://flu.gov/
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Darkwinter
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2009, 07:25:53 PM »

From Flu.gov
You can prepare for an influenza pandemic now. You should know both the magnitude of what can happen during a pandemic outbreak and what actions you can take to help lessen the impact of an influenza pandemic on you and your family. This checklist will help you gather the information and resources you may need in case of a flu pandemic.

To plan for a pandemic:
Store a two week supply of water and food. During a pandemic, if you cannot get to a store, or if stores are out of supplies, it will be important for you to have extra supplies on hand. This can be useful in other types of emergencies, such as power outages and disasters.
Periodically check your regular prescription drugs to ensure a continuous supply in your home.
Have any nonprescription drugs and other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins.
Talk with family members and loved ones about how they would be cared for if they got sick, or what will be needed to care for them in your home.
Volunteer with local groups to prepare and assist with emergency response.
Get involved in your community as it works to prepare for an influenza pandemic.


To limit the spread of germs and prevent infection:
Teach your children to wash hands frequently with soap and water, and model the correct behavior.
Teach your children to cover coughs and sneezes with tissues, and be sure to model that behavior.
Teach your children to stay away from others as much as possible if they are sick. Stay home from work and school if sick.


Items to have on hand for an extended stay at home:
 

Examples of food and non-perishables
 Examples of medical, health, and emergency supplies
 
Ready-to-eat canned meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, beans, and soups
 Prescribed medical supplies such as glucose and blood-pressure monitoring equipment
 
Protein or fruit bars
 Soap and water, or alcohol-based (60-95%) hand wash
 
Dry cereal or granola
 Medicines for fever, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen
 
Peanut butter or nuts
 Thermometer
 
Dried fruit
 Anti-diarrheal medication
 
Crackers
 Vitamins
 
Canned juices
 Fluids with electrolytes
 
Bottled water
 Cleansing agent/soap
 
Canned or jarred baby food and formula
 Flashlight
 
Pet food
 Batteries
 
Other non-perishable items
 Portable radio
 
  Manual can opener
 
  Garbage bags
 
  Tissues, toilet paper, disposable diapers

http://flu.gov/professional/pdf/individuals.pdf
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grower
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2009, 07:43:52 PM »

We are prepared to bug-in.  To me, it is the same as a winter storm, only longer.  We work at having enough supplies for at least two months.  I think we could go much longer although we may have to sacrifice so comforts.
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CX
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2009, 04:38:17 AM »

I have been focusing more on this than bugging out lately.

I've always been pretty prepared for leaving the house, but not so much staying put. Just been to the shops and done a fair bit of canned goods shopping.

CX.
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2009, 09:22:29 PM »

Bugging in for us right now, but not ruling out a secondary location that's a stable structure, later on.  Bugging in, gives you an advantage of putting all of your resources into making one location just the way you want it, not spreading them thinner.

But having a secondary BOL sure does sound appealing once I can properly afford it.
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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2009, 07:55:46 AM »

We live on a small ranch 20 minutes from town. Electricity is our only immediate dependency. To help with that we have relied on a Honda generator for years and just last week finished up on a Solar Power System tied in with the grid. If the power goes down, the failsafe shuts the Solar Power System down as to not energize the grid while the power company is hopefully working on the lines, but that can be safely defeated, need be.
We have freeze dried food that's nitrogen filled and then vacuum packed in #10 cans enough for my immediate family for a year, plus a dandy cellar with a 1500 gallon water storage tank. The food however would not last a year if it where ever needed, as we will have a house full and I plan on being a good neighbor.
This past summer we built a green house and as soon as we learn how to use it efficiently, we'll be growing some of our own... Lot to learn here, but we are going to have fun learning.
Being as self reliant as possible is a wonderful feeling. My Boyscout leader would be proud.
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will2power
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2011, 07:09:59 AM »

While I maintain that food and water are probably the most important things for the
bug in heres a few others that might be useful:

Cloth overalls (like a painter might wear) - If you need to go out
P2 fume mask - should keep you pretty safe from coming close to infected people
Staying a minimum of 2m away from people will help
You may need to isolate somebody in your house, so:
Duct tape and some painters drop sheets
Will be very helpful if you've got single inverter Air Con and not ducted
Isolate the person, put plastic over the doors and or windows and duct tape them
Leave the AC running at a comfortable temp ventilating the room
Installing carbon filters in your unit helps, if your really keen, put UV light tubes in the unit, keep that fan speed low and the Uv light will kill germs other way in and out.

If the power is out resort to fume masks and overalls
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maustypsu
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2011, 06:07:30 PM »

I like the UV light idea.  Do you have any links explaining this?  Like how much lighting, how long, how much or how little air flow, etc?  Does it kill bacteria only or viruses as well?

It would be worth reading up on.  For only a few bucks you could buy some extra bulbs and if it does any good at all against what you are bugging in for would be well worth having around.  But I'm not biologist so not sure what it would be good for.

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midge
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2011, 02:20:12 PM »

I have planned all along to stay right where I am, if there is any possible chance.  Barring toxic chemical spills or such that would make the area untenable, here is where I will be.  It is bugging Out that would be hard for me.

I, and at least nine other people can do just fine for at least a year if we never step off the property if the well stays good. Longer if I can keep the gardens going.

Even so, I'm always finding something else that could be added, increased or improved. I'm sure that I'll find something to go "Duh!" over within moments of locking that front gate.   
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will2power
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« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2011, 06:42:06 AM »

maustypsu,

Sorry its taken me a million years to get back to you, have been camping for a month.

Im not sure where I heard about the possible use of UV lights, so I don't really know.
They are a good sterile tool. they do take awhile to work though, I wouldn't like to guess. sorry

I have access to a lab at my University, we cultured up a flu - nothing serious, just get somebody with a cold to cough in a petrie dish (is that how you spell petrie?)
Under a microscope we looked at different ways of killing it; bleach, alcohol, chlorine ect all worked very well
Then we tried to get it through filters. Surprisingly it will travel through most things, like cotton, so a bandanna wont help. P2 Masks are perfect, Carbon filters worked unless the solution was in constant contact with the filter - which would be the equivalent of somebody climbing on your roof and coughing into the unit, and doing it for an hour or 2. Unlikely

The best was 1/2 micron pads, I've got a small fluid pad filter in my shed that I can use to filter drinking water. these are mostly used in wine, beer or spirit production.

Problem is, The pad is so dense that it wont let enough air through and will break the fan in your AC unit; even at the slowest speed.

Recommend the carbon filter, you can even put them in your car, they're popular in busy cities to filter out other pollutants and smells.

Cheers
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will2power
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« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2011, 07:17:03 AM »

maustypsu,

Just found where I think I read about UV light.
Its a Western Australian State Hospital pandemic manual

http://www.public.health.wa.gov.au/cproot/2247/2/pandemic-infec-guidelines.pdf

Don't ask how I ended up with a copy of this?? weird? - I live on the other side of the country


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maustypsu
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« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2011, 05:35:06 PM »

maustypsu,

Just found where I think I read about UV light.
Its a Western Australian State Hospital pandemic manual

http://www.public.health.wa.gov.au/cproot/2247/2/pandemic-infec-guidelines.pdf

Don't ask how I ended up with a copy of this?? weird? - I live on the other side of the country



I appreciate the follow up, Will.  Hope your month long camping trip was fun!


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markthenewf
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« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2012, 06:22:40 PM »

Well, watched 'Contagion' last night.  Oy.  Check out the trailer.

Official Contagion Trailer


Not a lot of people liked it because it wasn't a 'blockbuster' or 'indi' movie.  I thought it was pretty good.
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mbarnatl
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« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2012, 07:13:58 PM »

Bug in or Bug out... It depends on the scenario. The importance of planning and having multiple news sources allows you to make a better decision to stay or go.

...But having a secondary BOL sure does sound appealing once I can properly afford it.

I have several BOL and can afford everyone of them... networking is a great thing. By the way Bob, you have a BOL here in GA. if needed.  Wink
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